John Walsh

John Walsh

John Walsh, Ph.D., is an Associate Professor of Gerontology and a member of the Neuroscience Program at USC. He received his undergraduate degree in biology from the University of California, Irvine, and was awarded a Ph.D. in physiology and biomedical sciences from the University of Texas School of Medicine in Houston. Dr. Walsh's research focuses on the electrophysiological analysis of brain areas that are targets of age related disease. He studies topics in aging, calcium, and free radical physiology in his laboratory as they relate to changes in nerve cell connections, synaptic plasticity, and cell behavior. His research also examines how toxic environmental challenges affect nerve cell populations typically lost in Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, and Alzheimer’s disease. He has an interdisciplinary research approach that incorporates a broad range of disciplines, including biology, chemistry, physics, gerontology, and engineering. Dr. Walsh collaborates with scientists across both the University Park and Health Science Campuses.

Dr. Walsh believes opportunity is key to getting undergraduate students interested in research, and he encourages undergraduate student involvement in his research projects. He currently has five undergraduate researchers in his laboratory, who are active in research and writing scientific publications.

Dr. Walsh’s teaching approach is to bring together basic science, research and clinical applications in a way that can be translated into real-world scenarios that are easy to grasp. He uses a multimedia approach that combines computer animation, videos, and interactive technology to help his students learn. Dr. Walsh has received several awards from the Office of the Provost office to support his use of technology in course delivery, and is a proponent of web-based teaching and learning tools.

As a CET faculty fellow, Dr. Walsh’s interest is to create an internet-based teaching resource to be shared by faculty across USC. He will be working with his many colleagues at USC to develop a neuroscience-teaching tool, and hopes to eventually build a program for technology based course enrichment that can be used by all faculty at USC.