William Deverell

William Deverell

William Deverell is Professor of History and Director of the newly-established Huntington-USC Institute on California and the West. The Institute is a intellectual partnership between the College of Letters, Arts & Sciences and the Huntington Library. The work of the Institute focuses on graduate education in the history and culture of California and the West; partnerships forged with the K-12 educational community; and a series of thematic working groups designed to explore contemporary and historical issues of importance in the region.

All of Professor Deverell's graduate-level courses are taught at the Huntington Library, in order that the Library's extraordinary book and manuscript sources may be brought directly into the classroom setting. "The pedagogical beauty of this partnership," Deverell comments, "is exemplified by our graduate coursework. We can do so much with and for our students by introducing them to the rare materials of the Huntington as they begin their graduate work. It is thrilling, and it is a major feature of what we are trying to do in the Institute." In addition to Ph.D-level courses on California and the American West, Professor Deverell teaches undergraduate courses on environmental history, the history of Los Angeles, and the history of photography. Prior to joining USC, Professor Deverell taught at the California Institute of Technology, where he was honored with the Associated Students of Caltech Teaching Prize. Professor Deverell's research concentrates on the history of the 19th and 20th century American West, and he has written extensively on the history of Los Angeles. He is a graduate of Stanford University and did his doctoral training at Princeton.

"I'm extremely gratified to be a CET Fellow," Deverell says. "It will be both a personal and professional pleasure to be working with superb educators from all across the campus, and I look forward to learning a great deal during my tenure." Some of the work that Professor Deverell expects to accomplish as a CET Fellow include greater integration of humanities postdoctoral instructors from various programs and departments on campus; continued work in TA training; and concerted mentorship of graduate students in their teaching and research trajectories. "I'd like very much to explore how we can better integrate our teaching across graduate and undergraduate levels," he adds. "Some of the very best teaching environments I've been associated with are those that include students from across a wide spectrum."